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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,841 (some duplicates have been removed)
will be priced at 90% ami. we wanted to make that explicit and we added the phrase for those units not able to save, "the owner must make good-faith efforts to ensure that before any modification to the sale price is made, that the owner during a six -month period is making a good-faith effort to sell the unit under the current program." similar to the first point, we're clarifying that the bmr rental pricing is at 65% ami, also having included a range in the earlier version. we're provide something flexibility in terms of the annual certificate if he annual certificate if he annual certificate if he xinc c: program filesxinc c: stenoprogram filesxinc c: stenoprogram filesxinc c: stenoprogram filesxinc c: ificate.trn /r/t}{( recertification of income. the fourth point compliance is referenced to the land dedication to give additional instruction to the planners to identify in the review process whether the land dedication applies to a single site or multiple sites in cases where there are multiple parcels being dedicated under the land dedication model. also under the land dedication model
flipper. we -- and probably most t.i.c. owners don't stand to make a fortune when a unit converts. the conversion starts at 30,000 and then there are the tens of thousands of dollars that you have to spend to bring thible up to code. then if you do so there's another 6% realtor fees and other closing costs so i think few t.i.c. owners will become wealthy off this process. i'd also -- obviously like to ask the committee to pass this legislation. the vast majority of units in question are already owner occupied. they're off the rental market. no rebilitial units are being lost. i would like to see somebody recognize this and stand up or minority rights. with lifetime leases provided with rent control as well as funds going to the affordable housing funds and property taxes going to the city when units eventually turn over, no one loses. id ask the committee make decisions based on the facts and support homeowners support those protected and put money in the coffers which will help everyone. thank you, supervisors wiener and farrell for your proposal of balanced legislation. thanks f
is an ordinance amending the health code diskloeging landlord's prohibition of smoking in residential rental units. >> this item is sponsored by me. this is the smoke free housing disclosure policy. it's a common sense measure for maximum notification of smoke free units in our multi unit buildings. so, colleagues, i'm asking for your support. i think this is important because it's bringing together not only tenant organizations but also the landlord organizations, the san francisco apartment association, with the mission sro collaborative which was the major impetus with other tenant organizations in supporting this to create stronger public health policies and to limit second hand smoke in multi unit buildings. the hazards as we said before of second hand smoke is well documented. there's no safe exposure level, it's cancer-causing, it's toxic, it leads to thousands and thousands of deaths each year and by limiting access to second hand smoke, it's protecting people's health. also, when people live in close proximity to units where there are smokers in apartment buildings or multi unit buildi
is that they often want to keep the family unit intact. although the victim won't be deported, she is concerned about the father of the children being deported. that has a chilling effect. that is a consideration that we as a community have to take. >> i will chime in on behalf of the domestic violence community; it has been a high priority for us to change the role of california and other states, operating with secure communities for many reasons; one of the major ones is the chilling effect on victims come forward, concern for their own safety or the deportation of the father of the children or their partner. we work with angela chan and the statewide organization against domestic violence; angela did a webinar, a top priority. we will support tom -- introduced on monday to strengthen california's response to this. we are living in san francisco where things are not quite as bad. you can speak to anyone no matter where they are on the continuum of immigration reform about the chilling effect of domestic violence survivors and families, and why the federal initiative is dangerous. >
of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the sa; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cardin of maryland. mr. carper ofelaware. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice pre
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the book and dvd are yours for contribution of $150. think about that as he watched recall in. let us know you a
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happened in 1847 is a consensus really across the board, people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all this, that a war was
by coming to the united states. >> eduardo lopez, you have remarkable footage that has never been seen before in this country throughout. in a moment, we're going to el salvador to talk about what drove a lot of the migration here. where did you get it? >> many, many sources. there's a lot of footage that has never been seen, that hasn't been seen in decades. again, this is a testament to the team that created this. our editor, catherine shields, is amazing. and so is our co-director, peter getzels. i have to say about the dominican republic, i'd like to make a point that one of the main reasons we made this film is to be personified by junot diaz, who is contributing as one of our great american writers. his whole life was changed dramatically by our invasion of the dominican republic in 1965 with 23,000 marines. something that most americans know nothing about because all of this history is never taught in our schools and colleges. so for latinos, whose life is turned upside down by our own government actions and latin america that many times we are unaware of, what happens is there
, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
inform prospective tenants of which units have been designated as smoking optional. supervisor mar, you've already basically explained what the ordinance would require and i would just like to add that over the years as the public has become much more educated and aware of the dangers of second hand smoke we've been getting a lot more calls with tenant complaints about smoking and in particular we've seen a lot of people who have called like i remember we got a call from a mother with a brand new infant, seniors with lots of chronic diseases, people with hiv, people with cancer and heart disease, who had just moved into their apartment and had no idea they were going to be exposed to second hand smoke that was drifting from other units into their apartment and they were totally at a loss of what they could do. this is basically a right to know ordinance. this would inform prospective renters where smoking is allowed so they can make an informed decision and choose to decide on an all terp tiff if they don't want to be exposed to the second hand smoke. and supervisor mar, i think you t
for the dispatch center and notified for our doc. our unit down there. and what happens is our doc will then notify, you are going to hear it on the radio and so we already have these vrt units in the third boxes, the responses and so the violent reduction team unit and the crime investigation units and our gang task force and homicide unit all respond depending on what the severity is. obviously if they died, the homicide will go out there. once the people get there and once the initial officers and the violence reduction teams get there, there is going to be an assessment made. they are going to try to acquire education or knowledge about what happened there and whether it was gang related. currently if that happens, and we have gone through this past weekend as soon as there is an assessment made of the situation, whereby we believed that it was gang related. we will do the redeployment and each week we sent out a schedule and it goes out to the violence reduction team and our swat team and our honda unit and it puts our trouble hot spots on the map and it is not only for gang involved shootings
but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man amaino and david chiu and scott wiener as well. they all want to get in on this great celebration because it's wonderful for our city. i have often said our city and our strength is our international status and we do that with all the sister cities, with all of the flag raisings, but this is kind of
or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? i do.ndistinct conversations >> congratulations, senator. [indistinct conversations] [laughter] >> okay. [indistinct conversations] >> will you pull that back a little bit? >> you have to pull back so we can see the most important part of this team. please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i
, if this is the case, what does this mean for how we should understand the course of emancipation in the united states and the difference between freedom and slavery. so i inauguration the become that slavery is national, that slave -- communities of runway slaves should be understood as what we call marooned. fugitive slave communities, and that the links between people of african-american descent in the norway state -- northern states and slaves in the southern states are important circuits of communication activity they we should pay more attention too. >> host: what are the primary documents you used to research your book? >> guest: i was using a lot of different things. i was using narrative that were written by a slave who so-call ran away to freedom, and one thing that struck me is that although we tend to think about the mason dixon line or the ohio river as the great divide and once you got to the other side you were so-called free, and i tended to focus on the first half of the narrative, the experience of enslavement in the south. when you got to the other side, a very powerful theme was th
status living in the united states is not an issue. we will not report. please. trust your san francisco police department. call us. we are here to help. >> commissioner turman: thank you chief for pointing that out. we already had a constitutional law here, i'm not sure that it is hour is the best use. the attorney general did do a law-enforcement bulletin; the issue is whether the local jurisdiction is obligated to use state resources to do a federal detainer; it is specific to the sheriff's department. part of the notion is that it is not the job of from my law enforcement to enforce immigration policy; we are here to keep people safe. we appreciate the chief's passion. and ultimately where people come is not relevant and using this forum is important to underscore that commitment, and i'm glad the chief is clear and unequivocal about that. >> victims are not at risk for deportation. that is abundantly clear from what the chief has said. our next line item is regarding the san francisco police department special victims unit. >> i would like to introduce deputy director,
that is blessed with so much but still has great problems. lend your arm in support of these efforts. unite us, encourage us, strengthen us, protect us. go with us lord. bless this effort and this city as it under takes it and it's under your great name that we pray. amen. >> thank you all for coming >> my name is phil ginsburg and the general manager of the san francisco parks and rec department and i want to welcome everybody to the 83rd annual holiday tree lighting. happy holidays to you all. this is san francisco's official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's tree and over 100 years old, and tonight it sports over 550 christmas holiday lights. >> five, four, three, two, one! >> yay! >> i have been a cable car grip for 21 years. i am a third generation. my grand farther and my dad worked over in green division for 27. i guess you could say it's blood. >> come on in. have a seat. hold on. i like it because i am standing up. i am outside without a roof over my head and i see all kinds of people. >> you catch up to people you know from the past. you know. went to school with. people
states, he will protect the constitution of the united states, and that is what i hope he takes very literally, and not hypocritically. i hope that he does take it literally, like i said. >> he brings up the topic of guns and gun violence. something that we will hear from the president in the weeks ahead. do you think it will be in the inaugural address? >> not explicitly. maybe some reference to making our country safer, keeping our children safe may be in their, but he will not make a pitch for gun legislation, not explicitly. >> what makes a successful second inaugural address? [laughter] >> getting to make it. [laughter] being there. it has to have a good sense of the moment. it has to be not too time bound, and it needs a sense of history as well, because only then will be read years and generations down the road. >> i agree, it has to assure the country we are on the right path, we can build on what we have done the first four years, in need to be optimistic, not fatalistic, and again, it has to have the broad themes that will be fleshed out in later policy speeches. >> te
it was a year ago when you created this unit and housed them on the premier floor on the hall of justice and we fought for that and without that these people wouldn't be working in unity today and i want to thank the police department and the police commission for that opportunity. >> please call the next portion of line item three please. commissioner chan. okay. >> thank you for that presentation. i appreciate it. and the approach to all of these and looking at in a comprehensive way and the 55 page family violence council 2011 report is really impressiv3 test test >> she will present the district attorney's office on the review of san francisco rates for domestic violence. >> we flipped a coin. have you to be here this evening in front of of these commissions to talk a little bit about our work in the district attorney's office as it relates to domestic violence. as many of you know we have a vertical domestic violence unit as it relates to misdemeanor and felony prosecution. domestic violence notoriously difficult to prosecute requires building meaningful, deep relationship with the
was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, we are going to have a serious, serious problem. my
american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look forward to joining hands with you to make it as successful as possible. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> all right. and please consider me one of "us". >> thank you very much. and bona tale. i asked senator leno how do you think they say happy chanukkah in italian? and he said mozel tough and i am glad to be here and i am proud to be an italian american and it's been an important part of my identity. i believe i have the soul in my heart. [applause] . so there you are. and i remember my grandfather saying when he came over on the boat he was told the streets of america were paved with gold and found out there were no streets and he had to do the paving, and i think the strongest part of our culture is "the family". we may have our dysfunctions but our families never dessert us and my family didn't know much with the lgbt issue so when i came out of the closet i thought they would be so upset i would lose them. wouldn't happen. once my son had a sign that said "i love my gay son
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
on the united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution to the jurisprudence is his renowned commentary on the constitution. eminently quoted joseph story famously incorrectly declared, quote, a constitution of government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation and of quote. this lecture series celebrates the legacy into law. prior to the joseph story lectures have been and judge robert bork, professor john harrison at the university school of law, judge raymond randolph of the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit, and last year chief justice of the united states court of appeals for the sixth circuit. tonight we are honored to have a fifth name to the prestigious list as we welcome justice anthony kennedy who will deliver this evening's joseph story distinguished lecture on the topic, t
created in your image, a unit of god's grace, unprecedented, a repeatable and irreplaceable. we play -- pray for your blessing. with out it we will see only what the eye can see. we will see that we're created in your image, whether brown, black, or white, male or female, first-generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or straight, rich or poor. we pray for your blessing. without it we will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing we will recognize the abundance of the gifts of this good land with which you have and out of this nation. we pray for your blessing. bless all of us. privilege to be a resident of this nation with a. of gratitude in humility that we may be a blessing. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit, that will be leaders of this land, especially barack our president and joe our vice-president. fill them with righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will. endow their hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, and justice wit
parlors to traffic women and children throughout the united states, so i really urge you to say yes to this and if there's any other questions i can answer for you, i will gladly do that. >> thank you, lieutenant. commissioner kingsley. commissioner loftus, i'm sorry. >> go ahead. lieutenant, thank you very much. just your few minutes here are very informative. i'm wondering what exactly will be done with the $200,000. >> what we're looking to do is increase the investigations. it's very time-consuming. the elements to discover human trafficking, it can come in different forms. it can be a deaf domestic violence call that results in us finding human trafficking. we have some stats for you regarding what was investigated and at this point last year we had 107 cases that were investigated. we had 74 identified victims of human trafficking. that was just law enforcement based, a total of 369 victims were identified through services provided through agency-specific legal outreach or other services. what we're trying to do is work in cooperation with them so the police department
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,841 (some duplicates have been removed)